assume vivid astro focus

assume vivid astro focus (all lowercase) is comprised of Eli Sudbrack and Christophe Hamaide-Pierson, Eli Sudbrack was born in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil and, lives and works between São Paulo and New York. Christophe Hamaide-Pierson was born in Paris and lives and works in Paris. Work shown from their show at Suzanne Geiss Company in May 2014; The dichotomy is furthered by the exuberant features applied to the figures. avaf’s imagined trannies have kaleidoscopic skin, titanic breasts, and penises with minds of their own. They become extraordinary, mighty foils to the hyper-sexualized female figures advertised in porn magazines and Marvel comics.

"The images we use signify a fighting power. They’re characters of change, characters that remain powerful even though sometimes things have gone slightly wrong with them physically. Maybe they have too much silicone in their faces ... . Still, to us they are like contemporary goddesses fighting the status quo."

 

 

Dan Tobin Smith

Dan Tobin Smith has over a decade of experience working as a photographer specialising in installation and still life photography. His work has been commissioned by clients across the fields of fashion, music, publishing and advertising. This series is called Alphabetical...

Starting with a commission from Creative Review to create the cover for their Annual and shot over the last 8 years. The project now incorporates 16 letters, comprising of 84 images, 4 films, a host of supporting material including 10x8 inch polaroids and permanent three dimensional pieces.

Each letter is different and incorporates a different visual idea. Some primarily conceived for film, some sculpture but always made as a photograph.

The project makes use of anamorphosis, otherwise known as distorted projection, helping to build the letters with a high degree of accuracy. This was used in commercial photography, in subtler forms going back over the past 50 years as a way of refining composition in still life photography. People have been using linear perspective in art dating back to the early 15th century and you can see an early example of the use of actual anamorphosis in Hans Holbein’s The Ambassadors in 1533. In photography, the earliest image using anamorphosis dates back to 1913, fairly early in photography’s history but it is also the most impressive in its scale of any photograph using anamorphosis. The Human U.S. Shield by Arthur S. Mole and John D. Thomas consists of 30,000 officers and men of Camp Custer in Michigan making up an enormous U.S. shield on the grounds of the camp.

Set designer, Nicola Yeoman worked with Smith on this project.

 

 

 

Michael Donovan

Michael Donovan uses visual art and a podcast to communicate his interests in the "Two Great Bookends of Life," (sex and death) as well as the exciting content that fills our experience. His work trains his eye on spirituality, intersections of culture mashups, materialism, youth, aging, objectification, mental health, environmentalism, and the confusion and joys we develop from living a life wandering through interesting times.  

 

 

Tierney Gearon

Tierney Gearon's  personal work often revolves around her family and friends. She considers it "the diary of my soul." She started photographing her children and that work was eventually shown in the "I Am a Camera" exhibition at Saatchi Gallery. She then started photographing her mother. That work was shown as an exhibition called "The Mother project" and 70 images where published as a book and called "Daddy, where are you?".

Maxwell Snow

Maxwell Snow is known primarily as a photographer—for his almost painting-like approach to portraiture—but in recent years the work has multiplied outward from sculptures involving human bones and marble, to large-scale collages, to fashion design (he's working on his eponymous line's third season right now). The man has very little sentimentality when it comes to adhering to one medium

 

 

Warren Du Preez & Nick Thornton-Jones

Warren Du Preez and Nick Thornton-Jones have collaborated together since 1998. Their practice is a unique collision of art direction, concept, design, photography, image creation and post-production. Their design team is run from 'The Studio', in London's East End. Through a shared fascination of the image-making process and exploration of the digital revolution, they push their discipline towards creating a more three-dimensional canvas. They regard themselves to be part of a creative renaissance, and in this environment challenge themselves to create what they consider a 'hypervisual' aesthetic, a stimulating visual state they claim provokes 'a shift in consciousness'.

Sasha Bezzubov

Sasha Bezzubov is a multiple recipient of the prestigious Fulbright Scholarship Award for his work in Vietnam and India, whose work regards the politics and environment of our changing world. The Gringo Project, Expats and Natives, and his upcoming project The Searchers, a collaboration with Jessica Sucher, look at the role of Western tourism in the developing world. In January 2007, Taylor De Cordoba will be showing his most recent project, Things Fall Apart, a series of landscape photographs taken after natural disasters. The show will feature work made in five locations – India after an earthquake, the midwest after tornadoes, California after wildfires, Florida after hurricanes and Indonesia and Thailand after the tsunami. Bezzubov uses a large format camera to create photographs where every broken, singed and twisted detail is visible. Arriving at each event after the fact allows him to witness the destruction with a degree of distance. Using the form of landscape photography, a tradition born with industrial expansion, these photographs evidence nature’s force as it reclaims land subdued and ruled by a myopic civilization.

 

Daniel Kukla

Daniel Kukla on his project The Edge Effect:  In March of 2012 I lived in a cabin for a month within southern California’s Joshua Tree National Park. While staying in the Park, I spent much of my time visiting the borderlands of the park and the areas where the low Sonoran desert meets the high Mojave desert. While hiking and driving, I caught glimpses of the border space created by the meeting of distinct ecosystems in juxtaposition, referred to as the Edge Effect in the ecological sciences. To document this unique confluence of terrains, I hiked out a large mirror and painter’s easel into the wilderness and captured opposing elements within the environment. Using a single visual plane, this series of images unifies the play of temporal phenomena, contrasts of color and texture, and natural interactions of the environment itself.

Jessica Backhaus

Jessica Backhaus was born in Cuxhaven, Germany in 1970 and grew up in an artistic family. At the age of sixteen, she moved to Paris, where she later studied photography and visual communications. Here she met Gisele Freund in 1992, who became her mentor. In 1995 her passion for photography drew her to New York, where she assisted photographers, pursued her own projects and lived until 2009.Jessica Backhaus is regarded as one of the most distinguished voices in contemporary photography in Germany today. Her work has been shown in numerous solo and group exhibitions, including the National Portrait Gallery, London, and the Martin-Gropius-Bau, Berlin. These images are from the series I Wanted To See The World.

Inka and Niclas

"Like the furtive ornithologist or the sporting arctic explorer, Inka and Niclas seek to preserve the perfect moment when subject and surroundings engage and harmonize. They are fascinated by that instant when travelers go still, becoming carefully placed relics of the captured experience. In this way, they are anthropologists as much as image-makers." Inka and Niklas are fine art photographers living and working in Sweden.

Simon Roberts

Simon Roberts (b.1974) is a British photographer based in Brighton, UK. He originally studied a BA Hons Degree in Human Geography at the University of Sheffield (1996), a subject which has informed his subsequent photographic practice. After gaining a diploma from the National Council for the Training of Journalists (1997) and a period working as a magazine photographer, Roberts has spent the past decade dedicated to long-term self-generated projects. Often employing expansive landscape photographs, his approach is one of creating wide-ranging surveys of our time, which communicate on important social, economic and political issues.

 

 

 

Kaya Behkalam

Kaya Bekalam is a German born photographer raised in Bombay. His project entitled "I Once Fell In Love With Myself Being Somewhere Else" is shown below. A suitcase full of old precious photographs from a Syrian studio photographer fell into his hands during a research trip to Damascus. It contained images of people who never came to pick up the pictures they had ordered, staging themselves in front of idyllic and exotic landscapes. According to the photographer most of these customers were refugees from Iraq, but also army men coming to the country’s capital on vacation. Confronted with the question how to deal with the material and the representation of those depicted, he started a photographic meditation on the idea of disappearance.

 

 

 

Burak Arkan

Burak Arkan is a fine artist based in Istanbul and New York. His statement about this project reads: When a digital camera is placed close to a computer screen we can discover a new disharmony. The intersection of the limits of the devices – the camera’s zoom and the screen’s resolution – creates blurry images. Having world flags on the screen to which the camera moves too close reminds the problem of having physically distinct but politically blurry borders between nations.

Osamu Yokonami

Osamu Yokonami is a Japanese photographer born in Kyoto and graduated from the Visual Arts College in Osaka. His style is at once flamboyant and surreal, muted and contained. While his work can range from pop and bright to understated, there is a continual voice that carries the images together, through the slight strangeness of the subjects and quiet expressions of people featured.

Naho Kubota

Naho Kubota is a Japanese photographer living in New York City. She received her BFA in photography from The School of Visual Arts with honors and her work has been shown in exhibitions worldwide including her most recent show “new pictoria” at The Artcomplex Center of Tokyo, Japan. She is also the winner of American photography 24, and finalist of New York photo festival book category.