CANDY Magazine

C★NDY is the first fashion magazine completely dedicated to celebrating transvestism, transexuality, crossdressing and androgyny in all their glory. A style magazine about fashion, art, culture, make-up, glamour, icons, amazing transformations and fun. Luis Venegas is the Creative Director, Editor and Publisher of Fanzine137, EY! Magateen, C?ndy, The Printed Dog and EY! Boy Collection. He is based in Spain and splits his time between Madrid and Barcelona. Since 2004, he has channeled his energies into publishing his three personal editorial projects. An independent self-published editor, Venegas' magazines -released as limited editions- are available only in selected shops, boutiques and bookstores around the world.

 

Mariette Pathy Allen - The Gender Frontier

Mariette Pathy Allen has been shooting the transgender community for over 35 years. Starting in the early '90s, my work focused on female-to-male as well as male-to-female people who live full time in the gender in which they identify. I photographed the evolution of political activism, young gender variant people, and made portraits of individuals as their life circumstances changed. "The Gender Frontier", published in 2003, represents an amazing decade in the struggle against discrimination.

As I lifted the camera to my eyes, I found myself looking into the eyes of the person standing in the middle of the group. Suddenly, I no longer saw a man or a woman, but the essence of a human being, a soul. Through meeting this person, I had the privilege of entering a hidden world that offered me a passport to travel beyond boundaries.

 

assume vivid astro focus

assume vivid astro focus (all lowercase) is comprised of Eli Sudbrack and Christophe Hamaide-Pierson, Eli Sudbrack was born in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil and, lives and works between São Paulo and New York. Christophe Hamaide-Pierson was born in Paris and lives and works in Paris. Work shown from their show at Suzanne Geiss Company in May 2014; The dichotomy is furthered by the exuberant features applied to the figures. avaf’s imagined trannies have kaleidoscopic skin, titanic breasts, and penises with minds of their own. They become extraordinary, mighty foils to the hyper-sexualized female figures advertised in porn magazines and Marvel comics.

"The images we use signify a fighting power. They’re characters of change, characters that remain powerful even though sometimes things have gone slightly wrong with them physically. Maybe they have too much silicone in their faces ... . Still, to us they are like contemporary goddesses fighting the status quo."

 

 

Alvaro Laiz - TRANSMONGOLIAN

In Mongolia, transgender people face extreme violence and discrimination, much of which goes unreported because the law does not protect them. Out of fear, many stay in the closet. Photographer Álvaro Laiz spent three and a half months in 2011 photographing male-to-female transgender people in Mongolia to explore notions of identity in a place where they are forced to hide who they are. “They cannot express themselves normally except in certain places. Your life becomes a scenario in which you are pretending to be someone else. Your job, your relatives become part of this performance, and little space is left to act as you would really want to be. It is insane.

 

Mary Ellen Mark 1940 - 2015

Mary Ellen Mark, whose unflinching yet compassionate depictions of prostitutes in Mumbai, homeless teenagers in Seattle and mental patients in a state institution in Oregon made her one of the premier documentary photographers of her generation, died on Monday in Manhattan. She was 75.

The cause was myelodysplastic syndrome, a disease affecting bone marrow and blood, said Julia Bezgin, her studio manager.

Ms. Mark began her career with magazines like Look and Life, taking a classic documentary approach to often difficult material and usually working in black and white. Early on, she showed a remarkable ability to win the confidence of her subjects, and she maintained contact with many of them through the years.

Her latest book, “Tiny: Streetwise Revisited,” for example, returns to the main character in the book “Streetwise,” one of several homeless Seattle youths she photographed in the early 1980s. The book is set to be published by Aperture in the fall.

In the 1990s, Ms. Mark made the transition to fashion photography and portraiture, with ad campaigns for clients like Coach, Eileen Fisher and Heineken. At the same time she continued her documentary work, photographing high school proms, autistic children and families in homeless shelters.

“She was a great storyteller,” said Melissa Harris, the editor in chief of the Aperture Foundation, who edited several of Ms. Mark’s books. “She got to know the subjects she photographed very well, and she was able to convey who they were and how they lived, as well as a sense of their interior lives. There are not that many photographers who can do that.”

Mary Ellen Mark was born on March 20, 1940, in Philadelphia, and grew up nearby in Elkins Park. She had two main ambitions in high school, shetold The New York Times Magazine in 1987: to become the head cheerleader and to be popular with boys. She succeeded at both.

She studied at the University of Pennsylvania, where she earned a bachelor’s degree in painting and art history in 1962 and a master’s degree in photojournalism in 1964. She was particularly interested in the work of documentarians like Henri Cartier-Bresson, Robert Frank and Dorothea Lange.

“I remember the first time I went out on the street to shoot pictures,” she told the magazine Communication Arts in 1997. “I was in downtown Philadelphia and I just took a walk and started making contact with people and photographing them, and I thought: ‘I love this. This is what I want to do forever.’ There was never another question.”

 After college, Ms. Mark traveled to Turkey on a Fulbright scholarship, an experience that provided some of the subject matter for her first book, “Passport,” published in 1974.

After she moved to New York in the late 1960s, Look magazine assigned her to photograph Federico Fellini on the set of “Satyricon” in Rome, and also heroin addicts at a London clinic. She went on to work for Life, Time, Rolling Stone, The New York Times Magazine and other publications.

In 1978, Castelli Graphics in Manhattan presented “Ward 81,” an exhibition of photographs Ms. Mark had taken at the maximum-security women’s ward of a state mental hospital in Oregon, where she lived for two months. The rapport she developed with the inmates translated into strikingly de-dramatized representations of humans in extreme circumstances, in contrast to the freakish portraits made by Diane Arbus.

 The empathy and humanism of the work, published in book form in 1979, impressed critics. Robert Hughes, in Time, called “Ward 81” “one of the most delicately shaded studies of vulnerability ever set on film.” After the show, Ms. Mark signed with the Magnum photo agency.

Her interest in social outcasts remained a constant throughout her career, reflected in the book “Falkland Road: Prostitutes of Bombay” (1981), unusual for being in color. While on assignment for Life in 1983, she began photographing homeless teenagers in Seattle, a ragtag collection of small-time drug dealers, prostitutes and panhandlers who populate the pages of “Streetwise,” published in 1988. With her husband, the filmmaker Martin Bell, who survives her, she turned her encounters into a film, which was nominated for the Academy Award for best documentary in 1984.

Her other books include “Indian Circus” (1993), “Twins” (2003), “Prom” (2012) and “Man and Beast” (2014), as well as several collections that gather her best work, notably “Mary Ellen Mark: Portraits” (1995), “Mary Ellen Mark: American Odyssey” (1999) and “Exposure” (2006). She was the subject of a traveling retrospective exhibition, “Mary Ellen Mark: 25 Years,” which opened in 1992 at the International Center of Photography in Manhattan.

In 2014, she was given the Lifetime Achievement in Photography Award from George Eastman House.

“I would die if I had to be confined,” Ms. Mark told an interviewer for the introduction to “Passport.” “I don’t want to feel that I’m missing out on experiencing as much as I can. For me, experiencing is knowing people all over the world and being able to photograph.”

-William Grimes, New York Times

Dan Tobin Smith

Dan Tobin Smith has over a decade of experience working as a photographer specialising in installation and still life photography. His work has been commissioned by clients across the fields of fashion, music, publishing and advertising. This series is called Alphabetical...

Starting with a commission from Creative Review to create the cover for their Annual and shot over the last 8 years. The project now incorporates 16 letters, comprising of 84 images, 4 films, a host of supporting material including 10x8 inch polaroids and permanent three dimensional pieces.

Each letter is different and incorporates a different visual idea. Some primarily conceived for film, some sculpture but always made as a photograph.

The project makes use of anamorphosis, otherwise known as distorted projection, helping to build the letters with a high degree of accuracy. This was used in commercial photography, in subtler forms going back over the past 50 years as a way of refining composition in still life photography. People have been using linear perspective in art dating back to the early 15th century and you can see an early example of the use of actual anamorphosis in Hans Holbein’s The Ambassadors in 1533. In photography, the earliest image using anamorphosis dates back to 1913, fairly early in photography’s history but it is also the most impressive in its scale of any photograph using anamorphosis. The Human U.S. Shield by Arthur S. Mole and John D. Thomas consists of 30,000 officers and men of Camp Custer in Michigan making up an enormous U.S. shield on the grounds of the camp.

Set designer, Nicola Yeoman worked with Smith on this project.

 

 

 

Charlotte Rutherford

Charlotte Rutherford’s photography is fun, bright and tinged with humor and 1980s sass. Shooting editorial for the likes of Vice and Tank magazine and look-books for Lazy Oaf and Baby G, the self-taught photographer maintains an aesthetic that is both well-informed and original. She cites David LaChapelle and Pierre et Gilles as major influences on her work, saying that they prove the encouraging dictum “OK cool, you can do like ANYTHING.” I couldn’t agree more.  

 

 

Michael Donovan

Michael Donovan uses visual art and a podcast to communicate his interests in the "Two Great Bookends of Life," (sex and death) as well as the exciting content that fills our experience. His work trains his eye on spirituality, intersections of culture mashups, materialism, youth, aging, objectification, mental health, environmentalism, and the confusion and joys we develop from living a life wandering through interesting times.  

 

 

Tierney Gearon

Tierney Gearon's  personal work often revolves around her family and friends. She considers it "the diary of my soul." She started photographing her children and that work was eventually shown in the "I Am a Camera" exhibition at Saatchi Gallery. She then started photographing her mother. That work was shown as an exhibition called "The Mother project" and 70 images where published as a book and called "Daddy, where are you?".

Maxwell Snow

Maxwell Snow is known primarily as a photographer—for his almost painting-like approach to portraiture—but in recent years the work has multiplied outward from sculptures involving human bones and marble, to large-scale collages, to fashion design (he's working on his eponymous line's third season right now). The man has very little sentimentality when it comes to adhering to one medium

 

 

Cheryl Dunn

Cheryl Dunn spent a large part of her career documenting city streets; and the people who strive to leave their mark there from graffiti writers, artists, skaters, boxers, bikers, protesters, and assorted characters. In the late 90's she began to focus on filmmaking, creating classic films about artists of her generation who have influenced the realities of urban life through their own work. She also has shot for companies like Ray Ban and Adidas. Recently, Dunn made an amazing documentary about New York street photographers called Everybody Street.

 

 

Warren Du Preez & Nick Thornton-Jones

Warren Du Preez and Nick Thornton-Jones have collaborated together since 1998. Their practice is a unique collision of art direction, concept, design, photography, image creation and post-production. Their design team is run from 'The Studio', in London's East End. Through a shared fascination of the image-making process and exploration of the digital revolution, they push their discipline towards creating a more three-dimensional canvas. They regard themselves to be part of a creative renaissance, and in this environment challenge themselves to create what they consider a 'hypervisual' aesthetic, a stimulating visual state they claim provokes 'a shift in consciousness'.

Hassan Hajjaj

Hassan Hajjaj, Multidisciplinary photographer and artist. Takes his pop-up studio through Morocco, London, and Paris. Amazing mixed media photographs from his ongoing series “My Rock Stars”. Hajjaj is a self-taught and thoroughly versatile artist whose work includes portraiture, installation, performance, fashion, and interior design, including furniture made from recycled utilitarian objects from North Africa, such as upturned Coca-Cola crates as stools and aluminum cans turned into lamps.